It can never be too early, but it can always be too late

As a solo practitioner, I now find myself doing a lot of networking. In recent months the phrase, “It can never be too early, but it can always be too late” has become a part of my lawyer lexicon. I think it is a phrase that is applicable to certain parts of our lives, but it definitely applies when speaking about what I do– mainly the practice of elder law and trusts and estates.

I generally deal with an older population- people who have lived life,  gained insight and experience (or maybe not) and, at the very least,  have a life to reflect on. But I also meet with younger people: single, married, with or without children, whose own  experiences have influenced their life outlook.  There is never a right age to plan for the future- it really depends on the person and their circumstances.  Some people need to feel “ready” to do so. News flash–you’ll never be 100% ready for anything.

People procrastinate when it comes to estate planning. My own parents did it, so it does not surprise me. I think estate planning, in general, really forces us to confront  our own mortality and to literally take stock of our lives– and our life’s work.

We will all die one day. You do not know when or how, but you know it will happen. This a scary thought for many of us. Who wants to think about drafting a will where you decide who gets what when you die…before you actually do? Morbid? No. I just call it smart.

I  hope to be a very old lady who dies peacefully in her sleep. I want to age and die with dignity, like everyone should. But I do not call the shots when it comes to my aging and dying– that is genetics and the luck of the draw.  Who wants to think about what happens if you can no longer take care of yourself or live independently? Who wants to think about who will make medical decisions for you if you can  no longer make those decisions competently? Scary stuff. Scarier still? Leaving those decisions to someone you would not have chosen to make them for you- just because you did not make that election when you had the opportunity.

I was taught from a young age that we have to confront the things that scare us in order to move forward.  I have learned that when I have confronted frightening situations: 1) I am stronger than I thought, 2) What I thought was scary really was not, and 3) That everything in life comes and passes. As quickly as it came, it can also go away.  In sum, we overcome.  Survival is what human beings do best.

Do not be afraid. Confront your mortality head on. Plan ahead.  Believe me, you will fee a lot of better if you do. Who does not like being in the driver’s seat?

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